fick·le [fik-uhl] adjective
1. likely to change, especially due to caprice, irresolution, or instability; casually changeable

heros-of-the-bluebox:

sluttyoliveoil:

cough

rough

though

through

why dont these words rhyme

but for some god forsaken reason pony and bologna do

(via skellisovah)

Breathe

Curtains sway freely
In a flower scented breeze
Take in a deep breath

K. Senter
4/11/14

Little Rain Puddle

Oh, little rain puddle,
Catching all the drops you can,
Do you collect them so you may grow?
Are you envious of great rivers?
Do you dream of becoming a vast lake?
Oh, little rain puddle,
Catching all the drops you can.

K. Senter
4/11/14

SO MUCH YES. Great ending to a beautiful weekend
theparisreview:

“I thought the author was a guy. I thought it was a guy for three years until someone clued me in very quietly at Arkansas. ‘It’s a woman, Barry.’ Her work is so mean. The women are treated so harshly. The misogyny and religion. It was so foreign and Southern to me. She certainly was amazing.”
Barry Hannah on Flannery O’Connor, who was born on this day in 1925.

theparisreview:

“I thought the author was a guy. I thought it was a guy for three years until someone clued me in very quietly at Arkansas. ‘It’s a woman, Barry.’ Her work is so mean. The women are treated so harshly. The misogyny and religion. It was so foreign and Southern to me. She certainly was amazing.”

Barry Hannah on Flannery O’Connor, who was born on this day in 1925.

(via booklover)

Six simple rituals:

1. Drink a glass of water when you wake up. Your body loses water while you sleep, so you’re naturally dehydrated in the morning. A glass of water when you wake helps start your day fresh.

2. Define your top 3. Every morning ask yourself, “What are the top three most important tasks that I will complete today?” Prioritizes your day accordingly and don’t sleep until the Top 3 are complete.

3. The 50/10 Rule. Solo-task and do more faster by working in 50/10 increments. Use a timer to work for 50 minutes on only one important task with 10 minute breaks in between. Spend your 10 minutes getting away from your desk, going outside, calling friends, meditating, or grabbing a glass of water.

4. Move and sweat daily. Regular movement keeps us healthy and alert. It boosts energy and mood, and relieves stress.

5. Express gratitude. Gratitude fosters happiness. Each morning, think of at least five things you’re thankful for. In times of stress, pause and reflect on these things.

6. Reflect daily. Bring closure to your day through 10 minutes of reflection. Asks yourself, “What went well?” and “What needs improvement?”

—   (via katelizabeth)

(Source: Fast Company, via katelizabeth)

teachingliteracy:

amandaonwriting:
Happy Birthday, Kate DiCamillo, born 25 March 1964
Five Quotes
Writing is seeing. It is paying attention.
I have a Bachelor of Arts in English, which means I had a lot of formal training in reading.
Every well-written book is a light for me. When you write, you use other writers and their books as guides in the wilderness.
Reading should not be presented to children as a chore, a duty. It should be offered as a gift.
My goal is two pages a day, five days a week. I never want to write, but I’m always glad that I have done it. After I write, I go to work at the bookstore.
Writing Tips from Kate’s website
If you are interested in becoming a writer …
WRITE. This may seem like an obvious piece of advice, but there are a lot of people (and I was one of them for a very long time) who think that somehow they can become a writer without doing the work of writing.  Make a commitment to yourself to write a little bit (a paragraph, a page, two pages) every day.
REWRITE. You can’t sit down and expect something golden and beautiful and wise to spring forth from your fingers the first time you write. You can, however, reasonably expect a piece of writing to get better each time you rewrite it. I can’t emphasize this strongly enough; writing means rewriting.
READ. You have no business wanting to be a writer unless you are a reader. You should read fantasies and essays, biographies and poetry, fables and fairy tales. Read, read, read, read, read.
LOOK - at the world around. Pay attention to details. Open your heart to what you see.
LISTEN - to people when they talk. Everyone has a story. Eavesdrop. Join in conversations. Ask questions. And pay attention when people answer them.
BELIEVE IN YOURSELF - there is no right or wrong way to tell a story. This is one reason that writing is so wonderful and terrifying: you have to find your own way. Be kind to yourself. Listen to other people. And then strike out on your own.
DiCamillo is an American writer of children’s fiction. The Tale of Despereaux won the Newbery Medal, and Because of Winn-Dixie was a runner-up. The Library of Congress named DiCamillo the new national ambassador for young people’s literature in 2014. 
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

teachingliteracy:

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Kate DiCamillo, born 25 March 1964

Five Quotes

  1. Writing is seeing. It is paying attention.
  2. I have a Bachelor of Arts in English, which means I had a lot of formal training in reading.
  3. Every well-written book is a light for me. When you write, you use other writers and their books as guides in the wilderness.
  4. Reading should not be presented to children as a chore, a duty. It should be offered as a gift.
  5. My goal is two pages a day, five days a week. I never want to write, but I’m always glad that I have done it. After I write, I go to work at the bookstore.

Writing Tips from Kate’s website

If you are interested in becoming a writer …

  1. WRITE. This may seem like an obvious piece of advice, but there are a lot of people (and I was one of them for a very long time) who think that somehow they can become a writer without doing the work of writing.  Make a commitment to yourself to write a little bit (a paragraph, a page, two pages) every day.
  2. REWRITE. You can’t sit down and expect something golden and beautiful and wise to spring forth from your fingers the first time you write. You can, however, reasonably expect a piece of writing to get better each time you rewrite it. I can’t emphasize this strongly enough; writing means rewriting.
  3. READ. You have no business wanting to be a writer unless you are a reader. You should read fantasies and essays, biographies and poetry, fables and fairy tales. Read, read, read, read, read.
  4. LOOK - at the world around. Pay attention to details. Open your heart to what you see.
  5. LISTEN - to people when they talk. Everyone has a story. Eavesdrop. Join in conversations. Ask questions. And pay attention when people answer them.
  6. BELIEVE IN YOURSELF - there is no right or wrong way to tell a story. This is one reason that writing is so wonderful and terrifying: you have to find your own way. Be kind to yourself. Listen to other people. And then strike out on your own.

DiCamillo is an American writer of children’s fiction. The Tale of Despereaux won the Newbery Medal, and Because of Winn-Dixie was a runner-up. The Library of Congress named DiCamillo the new national ambassador for young people’s literature in 2014. 

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

"Morning"

Early morning mist
Leaves behind perfect beads
Of transparency.
The sun raises his head
Over the Eastern sky.
His arms stretching high,
He lights and warms the Earth.
Flowers shake their sleepy heads
Free from gathered dew,
And, yawning, unfurl
Their petals of warmth and hue.

K. Senter
3/24/2014

Bear

This pain in my chest
Dashes out all hopes and dreams
How much can one bear?

#rain